Gran Turismo 2 legends

Gran Turismo legends
Gran Turismo 2
 
Renault Espace F1
First of all, just acknowledge the fact that this actually exists.
 
To commemorate the MPV’s tenth anniversary, as well as Renault’s third Formula 1 championship as an engine supplier, it was decided that two birds could be killed with one 3.5-litre V10 engine, by putting the heart of an F1 car into the body of a people mover. Genius.
 
Performance figures? It weighs 1,300kg and the V10’s wick is turned up from 700bhp to 820bhp. It was, of course, a strict one-off, and never offered to the public.
 
Ironically, in GT2, it sounds closer to the more recent V8s. And no, it doesn’t actually go like an F1 car. Because it’s too heavy. Still though, it was not only very definitely one of the game’s fastest cars but perfectly alright to drive too. But mad and mental. That’s what this is at the end of the day.
 
The modern equivalent: An actual V8 F1 car
 
Honda CR-X del sol LM
Yes, this again.
 
Almost every LM from GT1 was retained but a lot were left looking hopeless. The ones that weren’t were replaced, such as the Chaser LM which was taken away by what the game calls the ‘Toyota IS 200 LM Edition’. Make up your mind, PD, it’s a Toyota or a Lexus…
 
Three former LMs stood out in particular, as prizes for golding each of the IC, IB and IA licences. All challenging. The FTO LM was one of them, but whereas it was the best to drive in GT1, GT2 crippled it with huge understeer in medium to fast corners. The GTO LM was another, and that actually got a second, updated version, a 1999 spec 3000GT LM with more power, a better drive and a roof scoop.
 
But one survived the ordeal, the CR-X del sol LM. A far cry from the sliding madness of the past, the car now took the FTO LM’s stability and threw it in to the lightweight 600hp body. Unusually, it had the same power despite lacking the turbo it had before. The result was not only one of the game’s fastest cars, but also a drive that was both fun and brilliant in equal measure. Once again the del sol LM was the most fun car to drive. And since GT2…it has never been seen again.
 
But wait. That wasn’t all it had in GT2…
 
 
…because you could take it offroad. Yeah. You’d better believe it, baby. Speaking of which…
 
The modern equivalent: Still nothing, because no one has thought to make anything quite like this
 
Lots and lots of rally cars
Gran Turismo 2 brought with it the advent of rally, and the choice given was very large. All the modern greats were in the game, this being at the time before the WRC was ruined. Granted, all of GT4’s rally cars were before that time as well (2003 was the last good season, by the way) but GT2 had an even bigger choice. And it certainly wasn’t limited to just the cars in the pictures, which include classics from before the WRC had even been formed. There were even a couple of relatively custom rally cars, such as the hyper-powerful Celica ZZT Rally Car, and LM editions from before were, as you saw above, able to go rallying too. The FTO LM was another such option, and remained that way for GT3 as well actually. But they’d do well to beat the one rally car that was above all cars in this game.
 
The modern equivalent: Videos of the WRC from the same time as this lot were around
 
Suzuki Escudo
Taking over the mantle of the errors that were the first Cerbera LM and Concept Car as the fastest in the game was this. But whilst the previous two were errors, this was more of an oversight…in the physics engine.
 
See, it’s entirely possible that GT2 did not cater to general bodies to decide how fast stuff went. I suspect it just took the power, weight, drive and downforce and then saw how fast it went. And the result was this, the Suzuki Escudo.
 
980bhp, 800kg, 4WD and a giant wing made this the fastest car in the game. Absolutely uncatchable and, of course, usable offroad too just to rub salt in the wound. It was biblical in this game. So much so they ended up nerfing it in GT3. The cornering, to be specific. Since then the Escudo has been beatable.
 
The modern equivalent: One of the V10 F1 cars
 
The HKS drag cars
GT2 was supposed to have drag racing in it. So a few bits of it were put in…then the game promptly went on sale without anything like it. Only three cars like it were left in the initial copy, and once the Dodge Intrepid RM was normalised and the percentage put down to reflect the fact that drag racing was, in fact, not in the game, these two were left. The most powerful cars in the game.
 
Both the HKS R33 GT-R and 180SX make 1011hp, which makes a real difference on the straights. But of course, without drag racing, these cars do have to take corners. Neither is very good at it. But hey, the power would at least keep you in the race…
 
The stats say that the lighter 180SX is the faster of the two. That holds true down the straight. But cornering is a damn sight harder than in the heavier, 4WD R33, which will at least not spin out at every chance. Unless drag racing does finally come about as an official mode in GT, we probably won’t see the likes of these two again.
 
The modern equivalent: Whatever the fastest drag racing car is in GT6
 
Mercedes CLK Race Car
The car PD don’t want you to know about.
 
The Mercedes CLK Race Car would be a fine car, on par with the seemingly similar DTM racers, the Calibra and Alfa 155. The CLK sounded the same, after all. Of course the DTM still hadn’t actually come back by this point, but whatever.
 
At some point, the car was taken out of the game. But all they did was make it inaccessible. It was still there in the code and people have long since dug it out again. And it’s worth it, because it does come with one very good feature – utterly ludicrous brakes. The thing stops quicker than anything else in this game for sure. You can brake later than you thought possible in this thing. Which makes you wonder if it was no more than a testbed for how far such things could go in this game. Or rather, it was put in that place when it was decided it didn’t have a place in the game for whatever reason…
 
The modern equivalent: Running into a wall suddenly and quickly
 
All the mad stuff
GT2’s car list was a vibrant one and I dearly wish more of it would be brought back in the future. You’ve already seen some of the mad stuff, but there was more of it within. The Skyline Silhouette Formula was a mad hatter of a racer from the 80s, exactly as touring car racers were back then. The Chrysler Phaeton concept was utterly out of place in a game such as this, but no one was complaining. The Vector W8 was one of the game’s top road cars, all while having a 3-speed gearbox and looking like an actual piece of cheese in yellow. And the Ford GT90, probably the most 90s of all concept cars. May a car list be as mad as this again at some point, please, PD…
 
The modern equivalent: Will hopefully come around some day
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